North Korea Threatens US and S. Korea with Nuclear Strikes

North Korea Threatens US -- Amid rising tensions on the Korean peninsula, North Korea has threatened South Korea of ​​imminent attacks and warned that it could hit the United States with nuclear weapons.

North Korea Threatens US — Amid rising tensions on the Korean peninsula, North Korea has threatened South Korea of ​​imminent attacks and warned that it could hit the United States with nuclear weapons.

North Korea threatened Seoul Saturday of military ‘blind’ strikes if it did not stop its war propaganda broadcast by loudspeakers on the other side of the border. The communist regime also threatened to attack the US with nuclear weapons. These threats come as the peninsula is experiencing a resurgence of tensions following an anti-personnel mine attack blamed by Seoul on Pyongyang, and the announcement of an upcoming joint military exercise between South Korea and the United States States.

They also coincide with the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the peninsula after the Japanese surrender in 1945, the celebrations had raised hopes of a rapprochement between the two Koreas, but both countries have instead fallen into a spiral of mutual recriminations.

South Korea this week ordered the resumption of the propaganda war on the border with North Korea in retaliation for the mine explosions on August 4 in which two of its soldiers were mutilated. The South Korean Defense Ministry announced that the speakers installed at the border would resume service for the first time in 11 years, broadcasting messages denouncing North Korean provocations.

Pyongyang, which Friday denied having played any role in the blasts, demanded that Seoul stop its propaganda war to avoid triggering military actions in the form of “blind strikes,” said the North’s official news agency KCNA

The country also threatened the United States Saturday of a “strong military response” if the large-scale annual joint exercise scheduled from Monday was maintained. Tens of thousands of soldiers will be mobilized for two weeks for this operation which is actually a computer simulation of an invasion of South Korea by the North.

Differentiating itself even more from its neighbor, North Korea announced Saturday that it had pushed back by 30 minutes its official time, to stand out from the time imposed by the Japanese after their invasion of Peninsula in 1910.



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Scott Richman is a small business owner and part-time freelancer. He is the proud daddy of a young girl and a strong gay rights activist. He is a contributor to The Cubic Lane.

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